What makes a super-woman?

On the last meeting at the library discussion club we decided on the topic for next meeting being “superwomen”. You can treat this as my way to ponder on what is “superwoman” and who could be called that. A hero from the science fiction and fantasy works. This could also be a way to discuss this topic with you.

The library discussion would be only about books/comics, but in this post I also refer to TV series and films.

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The Satellite Girl and Milk Cow

The Satellite Girl and Milk Cow (우리별 일호와 얼룩소) is a name of South Korean animated film for children.

A broken satellite is falling into Earth. By an accident it crashes into Incinerator, a scary monster, which operates with magic, and becomes a girl (android). She came to find a certain vocalist who “moved” her. That guy happened to change into an animal. His heart broke when the girl he likes fell in love with another guy. So now, he is a target of both Incinerator and a greedy guy who wants to sell his liver.

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Warszawskie Dni Fantastyki 2015

Fantastyka in Polish means both science fiction and fantasy. Horror is usually out, tho there is a trend to mix it up together in bookstores, probably because of the influence from the USA. Speculative fiction is grouping fantasy, science fiction and horror. Sci-fi is, from what I heard, a negative term for “soft” science fiction, not really grounded on “science”. What terms are you using in your country? What is considered “science fiction” and “fantasy”?

Those questions arrived during my lecture about South Korean science fiction. I talked about some examples of what is considered science fiction in South Korea. Why I know about it? Because those film/series were nominated for SF award in South Korean science fiction festival. Or they were screened during shows then.

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January Pile

January, a start of new challenges. A lot of books in the pile, still waiting for me to be read…

Currently reading

  • Korean Writers: The Novelists is a reference book for foreign publishers about the “most powerful literary voices that came out of Korea since 1960s” and about past achievements and current trends (2005).
  • Wampir i inne opowiadania (Vampire and other short stories) – Kim Young-ha. A selection of short stories from various collections of Kim Young-ha. He gained a recognition in the Korean literary world, and he’s featured in the above mentioned book. This book has 10 short stories, including 3 that have for sure English translation: Photo Shop Murder, Whatever Happened to the Guy Stuck in Elevator, Moving.
  • Someone Comes to Town, Someone Leaves Town – Cory Doctorow (Canada). A strange story, full of bizarre things. I read it for my challenge Around the World: A to Z 2015. I got it legally for free on Cory Doctorow’s website, as it’s on Creative Common’s licence.

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